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Meet Our Donors

Elroy "Roy" LaCasce, Jr. '44

Roy LaCasceThe late Elroy "Roy" LaCasce, Jr. ’44, a native of Fryeburg, ME, was passionate about physics.
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Irma and William Thalheimer '27

Irma and William ThalheimerIn 1981, Irma and William Thalheimer ‘27, deeded their Orr’s Island property to Bowdoin College with a provision that they could live out their lives there.
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The Maine Way the Strauss Family Gives Back

Ted and Janice StraussTed '65 and Janice Strauss have a strong conviction that there is probably no better use of money than providing an excellent educational opportunity for someone who otherwise would not be able to afford it.
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Enduring Connection to Bowdoin Grows Stronger

Steve '65 and Judy SiegelAs I reflect on the last 50 years, I realize that my acceptance to Bowdoin and my education there were defining moments of my life.
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Why I Give: Phil Swan '64

Philip L. SwanA solid and eye-opening Bowdoin education paved my way to ultimately becoming IBM's chief economist, which was great fun. Financial aid made it possible for me to attend the college.
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A Proud Connection to Bowdoin

Peter SmallFor more than a century and a half, Bowdoin has created opportunities for my family. I was the fourth of five generations to attend Bowdoin, beginning with my great-grandfather on my mother's side, Isaac Metcalf, Class of 1847.
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Alumni Profile: Len Bell '47

Phyllis and Len BellWhen he was just sixteen, Len Bell '47 enrolled at Bowdoin. It was during the summer after his junior year at Lewiston High School, and he enrolled at such a young age through a special agreement between the College and Maine schools.
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Giving to a 'Special Place'

Jennifer CraneJennifer Crane '05 knows a thing or two about giving back. An anthropology major who graduated cum laude from Bowdoin, she has worked across the field of education.
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Family Illuminates Educational Path for Future Students With Endowed Gift

Charlie Micoleau '63 and his son, Tyler '91Bowdoin alumnus Charlie Micoleau '63 isn't planning on retiring for another year or two, but that hasn't stopped him from planning ahead.
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Gift Profile: Jack Abbott '63

Jack Abbott"When I arrived at Bowdoin as a freshman from Caribou, Maine, I had never been to the campus before."
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Bob and Judy Toll

Bob and Judy TollIn 2009, Bob and Judy Toll of Oakland, California, gave nearly two hundred pieces of Canadian Inuit Art to Bowdoin's Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center.
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Dick '58 and Martha Burns

Dick and Martha BurnsLooking back on Bowdoin at his 50th Reunion, Dick Burns '58 reflected, "the good fortune I had to be able to go to Bowdoin has been a significant and positive force in my life.
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Camille '55 and Joyce Sarrouf

Camille and Joyce SarroufFor Cam Sarrouf '55, giving back to Bowdoin is the best way to say "thank you" to the professors and mentors he can no longer thank in person.
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John Halperin '63

John HalperinWriter, scholar, and college professor John Halperin '63 has always felt strongly about the connection between higher education and contemporary issues. He has continually challenged Bowdoin to make a liberal arts education relevant to, and engaged with, the changing world.
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A Sure Swing: Don '48 and Joanne Russell

Don and Joanne RussellDon Russell '48 credits his admission to Bowdoin to the fact that so few young men were left at home at the height of World War II. "If the College hadn't needed students so badly, I probably wouldn't have gotten in," he says with a self-deprecating laugh.
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Felix Verity '36: Renaissance Man

Felix VerityLittle did Felix Verity '36 know when he was growing up in the suburbs of Boston and in Connecticut and New Jersey that one day he would attend a garden party at Buckingham Palace...
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A Lasting Legacy from Judy and Bill Hazen '52

Judy and Bill HazenWilliam H. Hazen '52 didn't leave Bowdoin behind when he left campus in 1952. Rather, the College became an integral part of the lives of Bill, his wife Judy, and their family for the next fifty years.
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Ray and Alice Forgit: Building Bridges Between Brunswick and Costa Rica

Ray and Alice ForgitAfter years of summering in Maine, Ray and Alice Forgit moved fifteen years ago from Massachusetts to Orrs Island and now split their time between mid-coast Maine and Costa Rica, where they own a home and are active in poverty relief programs.
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David B. Humphrey '61: 50th Reunion Gift Profile

David B. HumphreyLearning is something I've done-and loved-all my life, and I remain actively engaged in education to this day. I'm lucky to live close enough to Bowdoin so that I can audit classes, and on most Tuesdays and Thursdays you can find me on campus.
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Steve Piper '62: 50th Reunion Gift Profile

Steve PiperAs I was turning 65, I did some serious planning for the next stage in my life. I had no plans to retire anytime soon-I still don't-but I had three goals for the immediate future.
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John '66 and Wendy Lord Reflect on Reunion Gift

John and Wendy Lord"I knew from secondary school in Boston that I wanted to attend a small liberal arts college in New England..."
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50th Reunion Gift Profile: Steven Weiss '64

Linda and Steven J. WeisThere was much that I loved about Bowdoin-my favorite professors: Geoghegan, Shipman, Darling and Storer; my wonderful classmates; the rigor of the academic preparation; and the emphasis on the Common Good, which helped instill in me a real passion for social justice.
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eBrochure Request Form

Please provide the following information to view the brochure.

A charitable bequest is one or two sentences in your will or living trust that leave to Bowdoin College a specific item, an amount of money, a gift contingent upon certain events or a percentage of your estate.

an individual or organization designated to receive benefits or funds under a will or other contract, such as an insurance policy, trust or retirement plan

"I, [name], of [city, state, ZIP], give, devise and bequeath to Bowdoin College [written amount or percentage of the estate or description of property] for its unrestricted use and purpose."

able to be changed or cancelled

A revocable living trust is set up during your lifetime and can be revoked at any time before death. They allow assets held in the trust to pass directly to beneficiaries without probate court proceedings and can also reduce federal estate taxes.

cannot be changed or cancelled

tax on gifts generally paid by the person making the gift rather than the recipient

the original value of an asset, such as stock, before its appreciation or depreciation

the growth in value of an asset like stock or real estate since the original purchase

the price a willing buyer and willing seller can agree on

The person receiving the gift annuity payments.

the part of an estate left after debts, taxes and specific bequests have been paid

a written and properly witnessed legal change to a will

the person named in a will to manage the estate, collect the property, pay any debt, and distribute property according to the will

A donor-advised fund is a charitable account sponsored by a public charity that donors use to support their philanthropy.

An endowed gift can create a new endowment or add to an existing endowment. The principal of the endowment is invested and a portion of the principal’s earnings are used each year to support our mission.

Tax on the growth in value of an asset—such as real estate or stock—since its original purchase.

Securities, real estate, or any other property having a fair market value greater than its original purchase price.

Real estate can be a personal residence, vacation home, timeshare property, farm, commercial property or undeveloped land.

A charitable remainder trust provides you or other named individuals income each year for life or a period not exceeding 20 years from assets you give to the trust you create.

A lead trust holds appreciating assets for a term of years (or for your lifetime), and makes quarterly or annual payments to Bowdoin College. The College benefits from the stream of reliable, steady gifts from the lead trust, and you're able to witness the impact of your gifts during your lifetime. At the end of the trust's term, all remaining trust assets are distributed to your designated beneficiaries with greatly reduced (in some cases zeroing out) gift and estate tax, regardless of how much the trust has grown.

You fund this type of trust with cash or appreciated assets—and receive an immediate federal income tax charitable deduction. You can also make additional gifts; each one also qualifies for a tax deduction. The trust pays you, each year, a variable amount based on a fixed percentage of the fair market value of the trust assets. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to Bowdoin as a lump sum.

You fund this trust with cash or appreciated assets—and receive an immediate federal income tax charitable deduction. Each year the trust pays you or another named individual the same dollar amount you choose at the start. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to Bowdoin as a lump sum.

A beneficiary designation clearly identifies how specific assets will be distributed after your death.

A charitable gift annuity involves a simple contract between you and Bowdoin where you agree to make a gift to Bowdoin and we, in return, agree to pay you (and someone else, if you choose) a fixed amount each year for the rest of your life.

With a retained life estate, the donor(s) irrevocably deeds a personal residence or farm to the College, but retains the right to live in it for the rest of his/her life, a term of years, or a combination of the two. The term is most commonly measured by the life of the donor or of the donor and the donor’s spouse.

Personal Estate Planning Kit Request Form

Please provide the following information to view the materials for planning your estate.